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Title: Monsters from United States of America Mythology


Dreamer - March 26, 2010 07:37 PM (GMT)
Well, basically this is a palce to put down examples of monsters from American mythology, whether they be the Fearsome Critters of Tall-tale legend, the creatures of Native American myth, creatures of African-American folklore, cryptids, and other, stranger things. I can't really think of any at the moment.

corpsecreature - March 26, 2010 07:42 PM (GMT)
Unfortunatly, we don't really have as much stuff as Japan or China, but we still have some things if you study closely.
The wendigo is a popular one. Its been told to turn people into zombies, werewolves, ect. Its mostly been described as a furry creature, but you can also find examples of it being a living animal carcass or bones. : D

dodoman1 - March 26, 2010 08:02 PM (GMT)
The Fearsome Critters are awesome.

The Leader - March 26, 2010 11:09 PM (GMT)
:lol:

Rasec Wizzlbang - March 26, 2010 11:33 PM (GMT)
Does Sasquatch count?


scythemantis - March 27, 2010 12:08 AM (GMT)
The United States don't have much in the way of a mythology mostly because we're such a young culture. We didn't go through a phase where we believed in monsters everywhere, so the closest thing we have are ghost stories, a few cryptids, and intentional "tall tales" that nobody really believed, like the aforementioned hoopsnake. My favorite of those is the squonk:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squonk

If Native American folklore counts, of course, then there's all sorts of great stuff. There was

If I remember correctly, Wendigo was almost always described as hairless, usually humanoid and either skeletal or nearly so. Somehow it's been twisted into a big werewolf thing in modern culture :(

If Native American folklore counts, the Cherokees have legends of "Tlanusiyi," meaning "Place of the Giant Leech." It's a real river where the water at one point forms a frothy, extremely deadly whirlpool against some massive rocks. The legends say that a giant red leech lives beneath it, and sucks people down and drowns them only to eat their ears, nose and eyes (really just the first parts fish will chew off by the time a corpse washes ashore). There are stories of the leech being hunted, which even describe how it balls up as big as a house before stretching out as big as a bridge.

There's ANOTHER giant leech in Native American myth called Weewilmekq (probably not the right spelling). It was said to be green, covered in red checker marks (matching some real species, actually), and had multiple horns around its head. It's only named and described in the legend of a heroic shaman who took on its form to defeat another shaman who had transformed into a huge snake. The snake was bigger, but the horns of the leech caught in its throat and killed it easily.

Spivsy - March 27, 2010 12:09 AM (GMT)
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ROOOOOOAR

Jesus lizard - March 27, 2010 12:16 AM (GMT)
Am-Indian leeches are intense things indeed.

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Ronald McDonald is pretty damn monstrous, but I can't for the life of me remember who the hairy chap there is...

Chiropto Necrolus - March 27, 2010 01:04 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (scythemantis @ Mar 27 2010, 12:08 AM)
If I remember correctly, Wendigo was almost always described as hairless, usually humanoid and either skeletal or nearly so. Somehow it's been twisted into a big werewolf thing in modern culture :(

From what I've read, the original Wendigo was a pale, skeletal, humanoid, covered in coarse hair, with burning eyes, a lolling dark-blue tongue, and only a single toe on each foot.

Nematode - March 27, 2010 01:57 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (Jesus lizard @ Mar 27 2010, 12:16 AM)
Am-Indian leeches are intense things indeed.

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Ronald McDonald is pretty damn monstrous, but I can't for the life of me remember who the hairy chap there is...

Grover Cleveland?

xolta - March 27, 2010 01:59 AM (GMT)
My home sate of Missouri has the Ozark howler winch is a mix of native Mississippians tribes stories and local stories, Basically it a cat with horns that howl hold. Most people think that the Ozark bear is behind the howler myths and sightings. We also have Momo winch is like big foot but with a pumpkin for a head. While other have described it has a a harry humanoid about eight feet tall, completely covered in hair with a round pumpkin shaped head. I prefer the version were it is head is a pumpkin not pumpkin shaped version.

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If I am not mistake are gremlins American in nature?

dodoman1 - March 27, 2010 02:56 AM (GMT)
Gremlins were invented by the British Royal Air Force.

Chupacabra - March 27, 2010 03:24 AM (GMT)
The Wendigo is awesome because its essentially the spirit of cannibalism and the wickedness of a cold winter. Basically when you eat someone, BAM!, you get imbued with an evil nature spirit; giving you powers over cold and wind and some animals.

Also, in some legends it eats its own lips for some reason.

Dreamer - March 27, 2010 03:29 AM (GMT)
Well, I found a neat little book online on some great, mostly obscure, fearsome critters. My favorite is the Gumberoo. It's a hairless, exploding bear. What's there not to love?

Edit: Also,there's the flying head, which is basically a giant flying head with long shaggy hair, knife-blade teeth and either bat wings or wings made out of its own hair.

scythemantis - March 27, 2010 04:00 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (Chupacabra @ Mar 27 2010, 03:24 AM)
The Wendigo is awesome because its essentially the spirit of cannibalism and the wickedness of a cold winter. Basically when you eat someone, BAM!, you get imbued with an evil nature spirit; giving you powers over cold and wind and some animals.

Also, in some legends it eats its own lips for some reason.

There's a real mental disorder where you can't resist eating all of your own flesh you can reach, with the lips and tongue the first to go : [

Wendigo was originally always described as skeletal or nearly so and completely hairless, dunno how it evolved into a fancy werewolf more recently...

Chupacabra - March 27, 2010 04:10 AM (GMT)
Wendigo psychosis!

The Wendigo is supposed to be so thin and pale you can the organs through its skin.

xolta - March 27, 2010 04:16 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (dodoman1 @ Mar 27 2010, 02:56 AM)
Gremlins were invented by the British Royal Air Force.

I did not know that.

Mecha-GREGOLE - March 27, 2010 04:38 AM (GMT)
Guys, you realize you're arguing over the physical aspects of a monster that's been part of folklore for centuries, right? Mythology can't even tell the same story twice as it is!

And anyway, HOW are we forgetting the raw, Dr. Who-esque awesome that is the Flatwoods Monster?!

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Or those little blue, clawed, rainbow-farting, bulletproof bastards, the Hopkinsville Goblins! user posted image

Chupacabra - March 27, 2010 04:51 AM (GMT)
PASCAGOULA ALIENS PEOPLE

What the fuck are they supposed to be?

Arachnid knight - March 27, 2010 11:00 AM (GMT)
Zombies in their current state could arguably be called american mythology, though the came over with the Haitians to new orleans back when it was a french territory.
Though those zombies were resurrected from the dead using "Evil magic" AKA brain-destroying nerve toxin, leaving behind a highly suggestible shell of a man.

The current zombie is of course created from disease, eats human flesh, and is now only recently able to cover much more ground, possibly borrowing these elements from the wendigo of native american mythology, which can be created when a man eats human flesh.

Dover - March 27, 2010 03:22 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Mecha-GREGOLE @ Mar 27 2010, 04:38 AM)
Guys, you realize you're arguing over the physical aspects of a monster that's been part of folklore for centuries, right? Mythology can't even tell the same story twice as it is!

And anyway, HOW are we forgetting the raw, Dr. Who-esque awesome that is the Flatwoods Monster?!

user posted image

Or those little blue, clawed, rainbow-farting, bulletproof bastards, the Hopkinsville Goblins! user posted image

Aha, I live in W.V. so I can drove to the sighting place. Also, Mothman.

scythemantis - March 27, 2010 04:35 PM (GMT)
West Virginia is America's weird shit tornado :P

We owe them Mothman, the Flatwoods Monster, the Snake Handler religion and more.

The awesome dress-wearing Flatwoods Monster was actually a misinterpretation of the original description. This is an illustration of how it "really" looked:

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xolta - March 27, 2010 05:33 PM (GMT)
Batsquatch is a other silly yet awsome monster. The Batsquatch is purported to have purple-coloured skin, blood-red eyes, wings like those of a Pterodactyl, and a head which resembles a cross between a primate and a bat. The creature's name is based on Sasquatch, although the two cryptids have never been directly linked to each other.
It so post to live around Mount St. Helens and new mexico. user posted image

Chupacabra - March 27, 2010 05:49 PM (GMT)
Insane rocket-alien is insane!

Anyone00 - March 27, 2010 07:26 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (xolta @ Mar 27 2010, 05:33 PM)
Batsquatch is a other silly yet awsome monster. The Batsquatch is purported to have purple-coloured skin, blood-red eyes, wings like those of a Pterodactyl, and a head which resembles a cross between a primate  and a bat. The creature's name is based on Sasquatch, although the two cryptids have never been directly linked to each other.
It so post to live around Mount St. Helens and new mexico. user posted image

I wonder if it likes to basket ball in a mecha...sorry.

Well there a actually alot of American mythological creatures especially in rural areas (which is just about all of the US at one point): it's just alot of them have there basis in the cultures of the immigrant groups (if not Native American) and have largely been forgotten in modern times.

How could the Jackalope not be mentioned yet:
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Then there's the Thunderbird:
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dodoman1 - March 27, 2010 10:22 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Anyone00 @ Mar 27 2010, 02:26 PM)
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That's not a thunderbird, that's Argentavis, an actual extinct animal.

Jesus lizard - March 27, 2010 10:33 PM (GMT)
We forgot Cthulhu!
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Cthulhu is in theory an American made monster.
He may not be in any actual myths or legends, but he's been around long enough and circulated through enough cult material to be considered a legendary American monster.
So has every other Old One, in fact...

dodoman1 - March 27, 2010 10:41 PM (GMT)
I defy you to find a random person on the street who can name anything from Lovecraft other than Cthulhu.

odioustrident - March 27, 2010 11:34 PM (GMT)
Piasa

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Maryland Goatman

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Mesingw, a NY/NJ classic

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http://www.angelfire.com/nj/becjosh/mesingw.html


Loveland Frog

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loveland_frog

Hodag

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hodag


Hoboken Monkey Man

http://www.weirdnj.com/_images_stories/animals5-1.jpg

http://www.weirdnj.com/index.php?option=co...id=44&Itemid=28

Crawfordsville Monster, a weird one

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crawfordsville_monster

Between urban legends, one-off sightings that started hysteria, and the folklore of various peoples, there are just as many monsters as there are in any other nation (Japan included). Japan had a type of Renaissance period when they put their oral traditions into text and other formats; this is where we get the documentation on these yokai. The US has too many cultures and too many sources, and they have not been complied properly. Notable creatures I remember:

One African-American legend of a woman who found a baby in the woods; this child later turned out to be something like a Coconut Crab or giant spider. There are also black dog variations in African-American folklore, not to mention vampire-type characters and various bogeymen.

The full Native American bestiary is almost as diverse as that of Japan. Navajo legends have armless-legless giants that can kill with their eyes, and nearby they talk about harpy type women that catch people with their hanging breasts! The Kwakiutl have a fun shark creature, the Yagim.

The vast majority of US based creatures on this list are based on folklore. There is plenty of Native American stuff not listed here.

http://www.thecbg.org/wiki/index.php?title...rican_Creatures


xolta - March 28, 2010 02:21 AM (GMT)
What about Champ he is Americans answer to the loch ness monster.
Jersey Devil is perhaps the most know of New jersey's many monsters that seam to fill that sates folk lore.

Anyone00 - March 28, 2010 02:33 AM (GMT)
So no one has mentioned Champ yet?
user posted imageuser posted image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champ_(cryptozoology)

EDIT: Whoops, xolta beat me while I was putting together this post.

xolta - March 28, 2010 02:47 AM (GMT)
Champ has been on beer bottles and has is own stuffed toy. He seanes to be a mascot for many things in the lake Champlain region.
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Ragspaper - March 28, 2010 07:15 AM (GMT)
What I love about the Hodag is how bizarrely Yokaiesque it is.

The Gaasyendietha is a legendary creature of Seneca myth. It's basically a giant dragon that is constantly spewing flames, yet lives underwater. Why does it do this? Because if it doesn't, before long it would set the whole world on fire.

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The montauk monster, while it was revealed to merely be the corpse of a dog, deserves special mention for all the hubbub it caused, becoming something of a legend in its own right. People speculated that it was everything from a biological experiment to a newly discovered species.

I'm not sure if he exactly counts, since depending on the legend he's either an evil spirit or just your average flesh-and-blood madman, but I feel I should bring up the Bunnyman of Virginia. Who is the bunnyman? Why, he's a man in a bunny costume who throws axes at people of course. Who else would he be?

Lightquake - April 4, 2010 11:08 PM (GMT)
Do sewer gators count?

dodoman1 - April 4, 2010 11:17 PM (GMT)

xolta - April 5, 2010 01:21 AM (GMT)
I am some what shocked that no one has yet to mention fiji mermaids.
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Rasec Wizzlbang - April 5, 2010 01:59 AM (GMT)
What the hell is this?

Three pages and no one has mentioned our ridiculous looking friend from New Jersey!?

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Sightings of this little fucker date back to before the US was even its own country.

According to legend, He was born of a woman, either named Leeds, or from Leeds point, Who, after having her 13th child, said if she were to have another, the devil could have it.

Apparently, her wish was granted when she gave birth to the monster, and if flew off into the pine barrens.

Depending on the version you hear, the creature either flies up out the chimney right after it was born, was locked away in the attic and eventually escaped, killed the Leeds family, and made it's egress, or some combination of the three.

Butcher - April 5, 2010 03:11 AM (GMT)
Native americans of algonquin base (powhatan, Mohica, etc) tend to specificaly include burnt ankle nubs (from cooking and eating its own feet) and ragged nose and ears (from ripping out its septum and earlobe piercings), when refering to the wendigo.

MuscoviteMica - April 5, 2010 03:23 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (Dreamer @ Mar 26 2010, 10:29 PM)
It's a hairless, exploding bear.

*sniff* BOGLEECH, I HAVE MISSED YOU!!!

ScutigeraColeoptrata - April 5, 2010 03:24 AM (GMT)
Cool MuscoviteMica is back! I was wondering where you went.




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