View Full Version: puppy prices

Decker Hunting Terrier Forum > General Discussion > puppy prices


Title: puppy prices


curdinger - April 12, 2010 01:47 AM (GMT)
what does it take for a decker pup to be worth 800.00 dollars.i googled decker terriers pups for sale today.and came up with at least three different breeders.that i see on this board selling pups for 800.00.this is going to keep a lot of average joe dog hunters from getting these pups.i thought these great little dogs where hunting dogs not designer dogs come on people give us poor folk a break.luckily i have one that is out of some of the best breeding out there and the breeder has become a friend in the venture of hunting these dogs promoting them as hunting dogs.just my two cents if it means anything.thanks ron

Danielle_Atencio - April 12, 2010 04:29 AM (GMT)
I personally would not pay $800 for a Decker puppy. It doesn't make a whole lot of sense to pay a high price and get LESS bang for your buck than you could for $500-$600... Just my opinion!

hurricanedeck - April 12, 2010 11:36 AM (GMT)
I believe that $500-600 is a fair price for a pup who comes from parents who have been proven hunting dogs, have all of their OFA testing, and maybe have been in the show ring a time or two.

When I add up all the money that goes into those rotten beasts in my back yard, I lose quite a bit of money on each litter. Good thing I don't do it for that!

I believe Meta has a site that talks about a fair price for a puppy - hopefully she'll post it!

Wmratz - April 12, 2010 11:59 AM (GMT)
I have a few articles that I saved on this topic. I'll post them separately

Here is one article that addresses puppy prices:

The High Cost of Cheap Puppies
by Jelena Woehr 2/24/2009

I’m tipping my hat to the movie “WAL-MART: The High Cost of Low Price” in the title of this blog post, because in a way, pet stores and puppy mills are the Wal-Mart of the dog world. Of course, the shirts and jeans on Wal-Mart’s shelves aren’t suffering like the live “products” sold in pet stores may; however, in both cases, you may well find yourself paying much more for low cost and convenience than you ever imagined. Read on to find out why a cheap purebred puppy is almost never a good deal, for you or the dog.
Why Pay More?

“Why should I pay over a thousand dollars for a puppy from show dogs, when I don’t want to show my dog, and I could get the same dog at the pet store for $500?”

That– or some variant thereof– is a question commonly, and understandably, asked by puppy buyers. It does make sense, at first glance. When buying a car to fetch groceries and commute a few miles to work and back, most people head for the Ford or Toyota dealership, not a Ferrari showroom. Why get ‘more than you need?’

Puppies from reputable, responsible breeders are expensive. They have to be. Contrary to the beliefs of some new puppy buyers, it’s not the show (or field trial, or herding, or Schutzhund…) record of the parents that you’re paying for. If you aren’t interested in competition, you will not receive a competition-quality puppy. Good breeders place pet-quality puppies in pet homes, and show-quality puppies in show homes.
You Get What You Pay For

What you’re paying for is the breeder’s work to produce the best possible dog for your family, and their diligence in ensuring that they will sell you a dog that does suit your family. Here are a few of the additional costs incurred by responsible, reputable breeders, which do not affect puppy mills and pet stores:

* Health testing– for many breeds, this means radiographs of hips and shoulders. In some breeds, it means an MRI or DNA testing. Any responsible, reputable breeder will do as much health testing as is possible for their breed.
* Competition. Yes, I just said you’re not paying for the parents’ show record. You’re not– but you are paying for the breeder’s time and expense in presenting their dogs to a judge, who helps the breeder to determine which animals are worthy of producing puppies. Think of a show record as a judge’s screening, which is complementary to health screening.
* Proper socialization. Puppies raised in a home environment adjust better to your home environment. This costs the breeder a great deal of time, compared to a pet store which can cage their puppies and pay someone $7.50 an hour to care for them in between selling other products.
* Post-purchase support. A good breeder will be more than someone you got a puppy from. They’ll be a friend and ally for the dog’s entire life. If your puppy is ill in the middle of the night, most good breeders will not only allow you to call them for advice, they’ll insist upon it. Whether it’s a week or a decade after you bought the puppy, a responsible, reputable breeder will be there when you need advice, or if the unthinkable happens and you must relinquish the dog.

What You’ll Really Pay for a Cheap Puppy

Now that we’ve seen why you’ll pay a high price for a responsibly bred pup, let’s look at the hidden costs of owning a dog bred by a puppy mill, like most cheap purebred puppies:

* Veterinary costs. We looked yesterday at why mutts may or may not be healthier than purebreds, but one thing is for sure: You’re taking more of a gamble adopting a purebred whose parents were not health-tested than one whose parents received all possible tests. If your dog develops a congenital or hereditary defect, most pet stores and puppy mills won’t give a refund or help with vet bills unless your state has a Puppy Lemon Law forcing them to do so. Even if they do offer a refund, most will require you to return the dog in order to receive money. If you’ve already become attached to your pup, you’re stuck with the bills.
* Training and Behavioral Counseling. Pet store puppies were often raised in cages, kennels, or crates, which can cause many serious behavior problems. Separation anxiety, housebreaking difficulties, pathological barking, and self-harm behaviors are all more common in dogs raised in cages.

Wmratz - April 12, 2010 12:02 PM (GMT)
Here is another published by Bankrate in 2009

http://z3.invisionfree.com/Decker_Terrier_...p?showtopic=238

The Price Of Puppies


The price of puppies for sale
By Roxanne Hawn • Bankrate.com

The old song asks, "How much is that doggie in the window?" But the price of puppies for sale depends on where you buy them. Today's canine consumers really need to ask:

* Why does that puppy cost what it does?
* What am I getting for my money?
* Who benefits from the transaction?

The answers can affect a dog's lifelong impact on your budget (and heart).

Between 1980 and 2005, pet care costs virtually doubled in real dollars. So, we're not talking kibble, but serious pet care cash. "The purchase price is probably the least amount you're ever going to spend on the dog," says Lisa Peterson, spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club.

Consider these outlets where you can procure pets.
Dog rescues
Shelters, humane societies and other rescue groups operate as nonprofit organizations or as part of local government to serve the needs of homeless pets. Higher demand for puppies means they often cost more than adult dogs. If a dog adoption is $100, a puppy's might be $200 to $500. Rescue groups typically include vaccinations, spay/neuter surgery, microchip ID, collar and tag ID, leash and other starter items.

The average cost to rescue an animal runs between $50 to $150, with housing, food and additional veterinary care adding $30 to $70 per day. "Adoptions are generally a financial loss," says Julie Morris, ASPCA senior vice president community outreach.

When critics cry price gouging, Dave Wintz, with the Larimer County Humane Society in Colorado, explains the tradeoff. "Those higher puppy fees save more lives. An owner-surrendered Yorkie that comes in today and goes out tomorrow allows us to keep that five-year-old beagle for two months."
Dog breeders
Puppies from avid breeders range from $750 to $2,000, depending on litter size and breed. "Some are more popular. Some are more rare or have smaller litters. So, cost could depend on that as well, sort of the supply and demand," says Peterson.

Budgets for a single litter run $3,000 to $9,000, and may include:

* Getting detailed medical screenings based on breed-specific health risks.
* Procedures such as insemination or Caesarean sections.
* Care, feeding, laundry and "whelping" expenses that ensure pups are born safely.

"A reputable breeder will spend thousands of dollars before a single puppy is produced," says Milan Hess, DVM, a veterinary reproduction specialist near Denver. "Basically, good breeders never make money breeding a litter when you also take into account all the expenses incurred raising, feeding, training, exhibiting, health testing and providing veterinary care for their breeding dogs."

Some breeders also use systematic neurological stimulation, socialization and training exercises aimed at raising healthier, more stable pups.

"From the moment they are born, I spend as many waking moments with them as I can," says Brad Phifer, director of pet behavior services at Broad Ripple Animal Clinic and Wellness Center in Indianapolis, who breeds basenji and standard poodles. "I feel such a responsibility to these puppies. I don't just want to raise them, house them and then ship them off to become someone else's problem."
Most high-end breeders mentor buyers for years. And, says Hess, "Good breeders will always take back puppies that don't fit into their new homes."
Pet stores
Puppies sell in pet stores for $800 on average, with high-demand breeds costing more. Those fees include puppy food samples and discounts on other purchases.

Pet store puppies come from commercial breeding operations. Bred in volume, following government regulations for minimum food, shelter, cage size and care, these puppies sell for $50 to $200 to brokers who sell to pet stores. "Pet stores then turn around and sell these puppies for an extraordinary profit," says Cori A. Menkin, ASPCA senior director of legislative initiatives. "We have seen puppies for sale in pet stores for as much as $2,500."

Menkin adds that commercially bred puppies often suffer medical and behavioral problems such as aggression or severe anxiety. Typically, these problems stem from:

* Poor-quality breeding stock not screened for genetic soundness to reproduce.
* Chronic sanitation issues when so many animals are kept in close quarters.
* Limited exposure to normal interaction with the mother dog, littermates or caretakers.

Investigators have documented respiratory infections, parasites, serious diarrhea and other conditions, along with genetic problems with hips and knees, which can require expensive surgery or euthanasia.
Amateur breeders
Puppies bred at home by average people typically sell for $200 to $600, with perhaps a collar, a toy and some puppy food included.

These home breeders incur some of the same veterinary costs. Less likely, however, are medical clearances and stud fees, medical breeding or delivery help from veterinarians. While these pups are raised within a family and not in cages, they probably don't receive the systematic developmental work as pups from more experienced breeders.

Amateur breeders may make a profit of $1,000 to $2,500 per litter based on lower overall expenses.
Free to good home
Puppies available free from friends, family or strangers most likely come from accidental litters. The chances of good overall care and health of the parent dogs and pups are lower, based simply on a lack of dog care knowledge. There is often no way to know the health, temperament or even sometimes the breed, if the male is unknown.

You're more likely to find free pups in communities overrun with unwanted dogs, where pups taken to a shelter risk euthanasia. However, one study of shelter animals found that "most dogs relinquished to shelters initially were obtained from family or friends at no charge." Reasons for giving the dog up included behavior problems or a family move.

Clearly, it's easier to vote with your wallet when the product isn't a puppy, but what goes into breeding and raising pups during those critical first eight to ten weeks influences the pup's relative "quality."

News alert Create a news alert for "smart spending"


Wmratz - April 12, 2010 12:09 PM (GMT)
Let me just say that if a breeder is selling these dogs for $800-$1,000 or so WITHOUT doing health testing, then there is something seriously wrong w/ them! Of course it's a free country (kind of) and we can ask however much $$ we want, but people are dumb to pay that much unless they are getting some incredible value for the dollar in this economy!

I did read that dogs who track out antlers that were rubbed off can fetch up to $5,000 but they are tested/proven dogs. (I think that was an outdoor life mag last fall)

I believe the same is true with PROVEN hunting dogs, not just pups w/ that potential unless they are from generations of PROVEN hunting dogs.


Wildwood Deckers - April 12, 2010 12:54 PM (GMT)
Well, I can't say I agree with either article... because they are not touching on the question asked... they talk show puppy vs. pet store puppy... I believe the question was based on hunting dogs.

This is just my opinion, but I think the dog world has gotten way out of control...

However, here is how I look at it....

I talk with and deal with hunters on a regular basis, not once has a hunter asked me have the parents to those puppies been tested for this or that... I have been asked how do the parents hunt, what do you hunt with the parents, do the parents tree, etc...

Now, i'm not against people testing their dogs... but for the most part we are promoting these dogs as huning dogs, and hunters could careless what the parents have been tested for, with one exception, hunting ability... they are not interested in paying for something that "you" may feel is necessary...

Lets compare what goes into show dogs vs. hunting dogs....

1. show dog owners spend alot of money on going to dog shows...
Hunters spend alot of money on traveling to hunting areas
2. show dog owners spend alot of money on tests
Hunters spend alot of money on tracking equipment, ammo, hunting licenses, etc
3. Show dog owners spend alot on dog food, vaccinations, wormings etc
Hunters spend alot of money on all the same...

Now, that is just a few things... but here is the clincher.... Hunters do all this because they LOVE it, they raise litters to keep a new hunting pup.. yeah, its nice to get a little something back, but we simple keep one or two pups to train, and need to place the other in preferably other hunting homes... but not necessarily all...

Show owners may do all they do out of the same LOVE, but they feel they need to recoup the money they put into doing what they love....

Now, answer me this... everyone goes out and does something they want to, to have fun without their dogs... go to dinner, movie, concert, out to the bar, etc etc.. Who do you look to to reemburse you for that fun and enjoyment?

So I don't believe in the old analogy... you get what you pay for... sometimes you get much more....

Let me explain where the most return on my invenstment comes from.... It comes from those three pups that won't stay in the kennel and decide to live under the porch and meet me when I come home, start treeing the barn cats, driving the sheep that get out back to their pen.... ALL BY THE TIME THEY ARE 3 MONTHS OLD!
From the first track a young dog picks up on its own and shows me an animal at the end of it. I could go on and on... but quite frankly, if you don't understand it by now, you won't... and thats ok....

I don't care if you show or hunt, whether you test or don't test... every extra thing we do for our dogs above feeding them is a choice we have made and should not reflect the value of a dog... I'm sorry, but in my opinion people are too wrapped up in money.... money don't bring happiness, dogs and happy new owners do......

I have been asked the question many times by hunters about the high price of Deckers with the same comment... "I can buy a feist or cur pup almost anywhere for half that much" .... hmmm... its gotta make you think.....

Clyde

hurricanedeck - April 12, 2010 01:13 PM (GMT)
QUOTE
Show owners may do all they do out of the same LOVE, but they feel they need to recoup the money they put into doing what they love....


HA! We know better than that, Mr. Clyde. And I think that most show folks, regardless of the breed, would laugh if you ever asked them if they made money off of their litters.

I've given away more puppies to good homes then sold them. I had a little old lady who I used to work with, she wanted a companion for her other Rat Terrier, I knew it was a fabulous home where the dog would be spoiled rotten and get the very best care, and the lady was on a limited income. Here's your puppy, spay it, take care of it.

QUOTE

1. show dog owners spend alot of money on going to dog shows...
Hunters spend alot of money on traveling to hunting areas
2. show dog owners spend alot of money on tests
Hunters spend alot of money on tracking equipment, ammo, hunting licenses, etc
3. Show dog owners spend alot on dog food, vaccinations, wormings etc
Hunters spend alot of money on all the same...


And show dog owners who are also hunters? Yeah, we spend WAY more than someone who does either exclusively.

But, in the end, we can say that our dog can not only hunt, but it has the structure necessary to enable it to do the work that it was meant to do for a very long time. Form follows function - if the function of the dog is to be a tree dog, it's form (structure) will follow that.

Wmratz - April 12, 2010 01:40 PM (GMT)
QUOTE

I have been asked the question many times by hunters about the high price of Deckers with the same comment... "I can buy a feist or cur pup almost anywhere for half that much" .... hmmm... its gotta make you think.....



IF you're hunting the dogs as avidly as George, Ellis, Clyde etc... and the dogs are bringing home the meat, that's a value-added deal, where someone who likes to fill their freezer with the fat of the woods would be happy to pay $800+ but yeah, prove the dogs can do it or prove the parents of the pup can do it! I don't see a point in them being kenneled, producing pups, and then asking big $$ for the end result. Where's the proof that the kennel raised pups are able to hunt true to their heritage? I don't think that the $$ means a dog is more valuable. I think the owners/breeders can build value even subconsciously by doing what they enjoy with them.

I don't think it's unfair to future buyers to request a price that recoups some of the dog-related expenses.

My personal reason for holding prices above the "newspaper" prices or whatever is to show that the dog is valuable to ME and that I expect someone to take on the dog with the understanding how valuable he/she is to me. I sometimes GIVE away pups or at reduced prices too, but the people know "Hey, I just got a good deal" It makes people happier that they have that pup, and more able to spend the time and resources to give it a good home or develop it's abilities. :) I'm assuming that if someone wanted a pup from me bad enough, they'd shoot me an e-mail and ask what I could do for them, and we'd talk...of course the price would reflect on how much I wanted THEM to have my pup. ;-)

curdinger - April 12, 2010 05:04 PM (GMT)
clyde im glad me and you are on the same page.i raise mt curs and they are hunting champions along with show champions.my last litter i had two pups both males they are 6 months old treeing there own squirrels already. im lucky to be able to get 150.00 for these pups they are out of proven hunting lines and yes i will only sell to hunters that will give them a chance to make a dog if they dont all sell i will give them to hunters its not all about the money.if i was in it for the money i would of went broke years ago.thanks ron

Wildwood Deckers - April 12, 2010 07:48 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (hurricanedeck @ Apr 12 2010, 08:13 AM)
QUOTE
Show owners may do all they do out of the same LOVE, but they feel they need to recoup the money they put into doing what they love....


HA! We know better than that, Mr. Clyde. And I think that most show folks, regardless of the breed, would laugh if you ever asked them if they made money off of their litters.

I've given away more puppies to good homes then sold them. I had a little old lady who I used to work with, she wanted a companion for her other Rat Terrier, I knew it was a fabulous home where the dog would be spoiled rotten and get the very best care, and the lady was on a limited income. Here's your puppy, spay it, take care of it.

QUOTE

1. show dog owners spend alot of money on going to dog shows...
Hunters spend alot of money on traveling to hunting areas
2. show dog owners spend alot of money on tests
Hunters spend alot of money on tracking equipment, ammo, hunting licenses, etc
3. Show dog owners spend alot on dog food, vaccinations, wormings etc
Hunters spend alot of money on all the same...


And show dog owners who are also hunters? Yeah, we spend WAY more than someone who does either exclusively.

But, in the end, we can say that our dog can not only hunt, but it has the structure necessary to enable it to do the work that it was meant to do for a very long time. Form follows function - if the function of the dog is to be a tree dog, it's form (structure) will follow that.

Rebekah,
Read the part you quoted me as saying again... I said nothing about show owners "making" money... I said they feel they need to "recoup" the money they put into doing what they love... there is a big difference....

Maybe you have given pups away, fine... one thing... everytime you read something mentioning "show" you take it personal.... don't, I have repeatedly said that at least you and Danielle are different....

Yes, as a show owner and a hunter you do put twice as much into it... do you try and recoup everything you put into it?

Just because hunters don't show doesn't mean that their dogs arn't functionally correct... if they weren't they wouldn't be able to hunt....

This isn't meant to be a whos better than who... Over the past 30 years I have heard time and time again from show owners that their dogs are worth more because of all the testing, care, etc that they have put into them.... and frankly i'm tired of it...

Breeding litters should have NO correlation with recouping the money invested in a dog.... if it were, every pup that someone sells without papers or limited registration is being denied the oportunity of recouping the cost of their dog, its feed, health care, etc... its totally rediculous

Don't get me wrong, most pet quality dogs shouldn't be bred.... but looking at it from the point of those articles, anyone that pays for a dog should be able to recoup their investment... Not....

Rebekah, one more thing.... please stop being so defensive... you know what they say... If the shoe fits wear it... that goes both ways... if the shoe doesn't fit don't wear it!!!! You dont' need to defend every person that shows dogs, there are both good and bad show people... just like in hunting... there are bad hunters too, if a hunter is unethical, poaches, etc, I'm not going to defend them, i'll get right on the bandwagon and drag them through the mud...

I really think alot of you and Danielle... but at times, the way you insist on defending show breeders as a whole makes me start wondering... I think its just the attorney in you... you are gonna find yourself in contempt of forum :lol:

Clyde

hurricanedeck - April 12, 2010 08:50 PM (GMT)
I get defensive when you put a blanket statement such as you did and apply to it every "show breeder." I feel as if I have a right to say hey! Not true - and how would you even know unless you hung out with us for a while?

It's like reading terrierman sometimes, who believes that everyone who doesn't have some kind of mutt in their backyard or desires a purebred dog really and truely deep down hates dogs and is trying to destroy them and completely dupe the public.

In the end, really and truly, every dog is worth the price of dogmeat in China. It's how much you are willing to pay which makes a dog worth the price.

In contempt of forum? LOVE IT - although this wouldn't be the first forum I'd be in contempt of - got a stack of 'em. :D

Danielle_Atencio - April 13, 2010 01:49 AM (GMT)
If I may throw in my two cents... And please nobody read this the wrong way, I don't have my hackles up... I did not get offended by anything that anybody said, I'm not out to get anybody... Just sharing my opinion here:

I don't agree 100% with either article, either... But they both do have good points. And, yes, the original question WAS based on hunting dogs. However, I think that a lot of people visit this forum and read these posts, not just hunters.... Don't you think everyone, including "pet" buyers, should have the right to know what is a fair price and what's not, and what they should be expecting to get for their money?

On testing - The reason people choose to test is really as much for the buyer as it is for the breeders themselves... I don't know what each individual person's motives are, but I think that most breeders that choose to test do so for the sake of the integrity of their lines AND for the sake of the breed as a whole. Think about it in this regard... Would any of you knowingly send someone a breeding dog, that had an off bite, or undescended testicles, or a really horrible temperament, or some other serious and obvious flaw? Why not? Because those issues should not be perpetuated.... Right? So, why then, is it "way out of control" that some people choose to take precautions against perpetuating internal issues like hip problems, or luxating patellas, or a heart condition, or PLL?

As far as the motives of show people vs. hunting people... Two very different hobbies, certainly.... But from what MY experience has been, I feel like the motives are basically the same - With hunting AND showing, the people get enjoyment from it, and they feel a sense of pride and accomplishment when their dogs do well. Most show people that I know breed primarily for themselves, they raise a litter to keep a pup as their next show prospect, and/or to carry on their lines with. Many show people (not everyone, but I know a lot of people that do this) will place show/breed puppies with other breeders at no cost, sometimes with a co-own, sometimes in trade for a puppy back down the road, etc. Sometimes the only pups that are actually SOLD are the ones going to pet homes. A show breeder might sometimes only sell one or two pups from a litter.... Not really all that different from hunters in that regard.

I agree, sometimes you get what you paid for, and sometimes if you're lucky you might get more.... But there are also times when you get LESS (it's called getting ripped off! LOL). I think that people, especially pet buyers, get confused by the high prices. They think "LOOK how expensive this dog is! It must be a really good dog, right?" ... Well, NOT ALWAYS!!!

I think that anytime your dogs are PROVEN at something, it does add value to them (and rightfully so!), and to an extent, to their offspring. Whether it be that they are proven hunters, or proven in the show ring, or proven healthy through OFA testing. That's how I feel about it, anyway. ;)

edrats - April 13, 2010 04:10 AM (GMT)
This is a valuable subject, and one we can all learn from. I am glad it has stayed civil! I don't think there are many subjects that we can all fully agree on, yet it is great to see this group has the ability to cover a touchy subject without going to war! I enjoy, and value the many opinions on this forum.

Ellis

Wildwood Deckers - April 13, 2010 11:43 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (edrats @ Apr 12 2010, 11:10 PM)

"I am glad it has stayed civil!"

WHAT! Its cival? Rebekah, we are doing a good enough job... guess we better heat it up a bit.. :lol:

Just kidding... it has and I couldn't be more happy about that... I am very greatful to have Danielle and Rebekah here that can give a different view of the dog world... Thank you ladys.

Clyde

hurricanedeck - April 13, 2010 01:08 PM (GMT)
Nicely said Danielle!

Scott Melvin - April 13, 2010 07:21 PM (GMT)
I'm curious, does anyone know a hunter that would be willing to spend 800 to a 1000 on a pup? I don't. I suppose the area of the country you live in is a variable to consider. Around here in the mid west, you're looking at 50 bucks to maybe 300. At least from what I've seen. I just picked up a Patterdale pup for free, in exchange for letting the breeder hunt here 2 or 3 times a year with his dogs. Of course, he's welcome to come hunt as much as he wants. But that sort of thing is pretty common; in my experience the only thing hunters care about it hunting lol. Not money, health testing, showing, etc.

edrats - April 13, 2010 08:45 PM (GMT)
If you pay $500 for a pup...and it lives to be 15 years old, the initial cost, if divided into months, is $2.78 per month. If it lives 12 years, it will cost $3.47 per month, 10 years is $4.17 per month. Even if it only makes it to 5 years old, the cost of the dog is only $8.34 per month. This cost is very small in comparison with dog food and basic Vet care. I am not an advocate of $800 to $1000 pups, so don't read this wrong. I know, if you are hunting dangerous game, the dog may not live to a ripe old age of 15, but I think most will at least average 5 years. I get more enjoyement out of hunting than almost any other activity. A $500 dog, if it is a good one, is worth every penny...IMO Certainly, trading for hunting rights is worth more than $500. Good land to hunt, with game on it is invaluable! I doubt it would be easy to find a hunting lease that was worth visiting that is less than $500. I think it is all a matter of perspective. A $500 pup, that is out of parents that are proven hunters...I don't find that totally unreasonable.

Ellis

curdinger - April 13, 2010 11:24 PM (GMT)
ellis you hit it right on the head aa good dog is worth 500.00.you never know with a pup you might end up culling that pup if it isnt right so i still say a pup is worth 200.00 to 300.00.thanks ron

Umpqua - April 14, 2010 12:44 AM (GMT)
I agree with Rebekah,

Nicely stated Danielle. And Ellis has a good point also....the value of a dog is relative to the enjoyment that the buyer receives during ownership....hunting, showing, companionship, or breeding prospect.

I paid a lot of $$$$ to KS for Chica and her diversified bloodlines (Mexican Gambler x Missie Lue Westerling) to cross with my Mr. Moose. I got two exceptional pups from that cross that I totally enjoy, that have proven hunting ability. So was the price too high????? Yes and No! Again, relative value derived! Only the owner can decide that value.

If a hunter doesn't want to pay the higher price for a hunting/companion, which over the life of the dog is relatively insignificant, to the enjoyment received....then maybe they should think twice about the value that the dog will give them over the years.

If the dog is free, or expensive, or traded, the value is the same, based on the buyers perception.

Clint

Scott Melvin - April 14, 2010 11:36 AM (GMT)
This has been a really cool discussion. Everyone has made some good points on both sides-breeders/potential puppy buyers. I'm with Curdinger, a proven adult dog is worth quite a bit more money than a pup. I like the breakdown of the puppy cost in terms of a monthly payment. LOL, I can tell you this much, I'd be much more willing to spend big bucks on a pup if I could make monthly 3 to 10 dollar payments versus dropping 500 to a grand in one whack on a pup that may or may not turn out.

Wmratz - April 14, 2010 01:27 PM (GMT)
Hmm... I don't think most breeders are in the sub-prime lending business. See, we're smart, we don't do business like the government or big corporations. LOL

$2/mo would be kinda nice though, on the buying end of course! ;-)

Slickrock Deckers - April 17, 2010 01:43 AM (GMT)
The fact that a feist type pup, even from great hunting lines, is only worth 200.00 to some hunters is probably why hunters don't generally buy my pups. I ask more, especially if it involves an airline ticket and driving 300 miles to the nearest big airport. I ask more because even while I enjoy raising the little buggers, I do feel entitled to recoup my costs. I value these beautiful and personable dogs highly and have gone to considerable effort to produce them. If you want to drive the 300 miles, we can talk about what kind of an owner you are going to be. And yes, you might get one for free if I like your attitude.


Wmratz - April 17, 2010 02:15 AM (GMT)
Jack, can I get a dollar off per mile from my door to yours? Oh, wait I think you'd end up owing me money LOL ! :)

You worded that very well, and I work pretty much the same way.

Slickrock Deckers - April 17, 2010 02:36 AM (GMT)
Discount approved. However we don't discount past zero and there will be a small fee of a dollar per mile for me to drive to the airport if that would be your preference. This fee will be waived if you buy me a ticket to Vermont this summer. I'll even pay the $50.00 for a carry on puppy.

Wmratz - April 17, 2010 01:34 PM (GMT)
Haha...cool! I'd love for ya to visit Vermont...if you pay your own way AND bring me a puppy, I'll let you go for a back road & trail ride w/ my husband. I'll even loan you my bike! (It's an XT 225 Yamaha dual sport) B)

Having a puppy party HERE in July! BBQ and puppy picking! Gonna be some striking & intelligent 14-17" dogs! Now, the BBQ at our house when my husband's manning the grill, is value added right there! Makes the dogs worth what we ask for them and then some! :D

Ken @ KnD - April 17, 2010 04:43 PM (GMT)
I read with interest what people will pay for a good dog.

Dare I ask what they will pay for a good gun,,,,, as they want the best when it comes to guns,,,, a $50.00 gun just will not do it.

I read,,, Any old dog,,,,, the BEST gun .. price is not a problem.

That has always amused me.

I hope this look from the outside does not offend anyone.

Ken

Milton - April 17, 2010 06:47 PM (GMT)
I've heard that a dozen roses cost $70-80. They last a week or ten days. How much is a good puppy worth that has a life expectancy to give much pleasure for 13 years? Milton

Michelle - April 17, 2010 06:59 PM (GMT)
I have told my husband over and over again to never buy me roses :rolleyes:
But he can get me a Decker puppy any day!
Michelle

Wmratz - April 17, 2010 07:50 PM (GMT)
Same here Michelle,

No diamonds, no roses, just fix up my Firebird or buy me a motorcycle, or a Rat Terrier. Guess what? My bike cost less than a nice diamond ring! haha.


Ken @ KnD - April 18, 2010 12:58 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (Milton @ Apr 17 2010, 01:47 PM)
I've heard that a dozen roses cost $70-80. They last a week or ten days.  How much is a good puppy worth that has a life expectancy to give much pleasure for 13 years?    Milton

Mr. Decker.

I heard of a man in OK paying $25,000.00 for one pit bull terrier.... so I guess price is governed by the buyer a little too.

I have seen pit bulls at wal-mart car park for $50.00

I feel Rat Terriers are the same a little.... There are Rat Terriers and there are Rat Terriers.

I tell people yes they can find Ratties a lot cheaper than mine,,, I too have seen them for $40.00

But I add,,,,, "You can buy a car for $50.00 too,,,, But can you leave home with it"????

Regardless of what some here are saying,,,, they must remember,,, You will get what you pay for.

Yahoo email is a good example,,,, it is free,,,,, and I believe it is over priced at that. lol

Ken

Scott Melvin - April 18, 2010 06:18 PM (GMT)
Yeah dogs are like anything else, they're worth what a buyer is willing to pay. I certainly understand breeders setting prices to at least recoup their investment, heck I'm not against anyone making a profit if you're able to do it. But a good dog is where you find it. For me, no matter how well bred, a pup is a crap shoot. I'm willing to spend upwards of 500$ for a pup out of something I really think will turn into what I want. I'd be willing to spend considerably more for a finished, proven adult dog. Those are just thoughts of a "customer", if I get into breeding, I'll be able to see the other side of it. Sure appreciate you folks who do breed telling us how it is from your side.

FromHangTown - April 18, 2010 09:29 PM (GMT)
I grew up bird hunting in Bakersfield. If was not unknown for someone to pay big dollars for a pup from proven lines. I paid $1700 for a Brit in 1976. A good bird dog is well worth the money.

In AKC hunting dogs there are major differences in the show and field versions. Most often they do not even look like the same breed.

Not so in UKC dogs. I find it very unfair to make blanket statements such as I have seen here. UKC show breeders for the most part do their darnedest to to keep the intent of the breed intact. They are cleaning up mistake from past breeders diligently. A good UKC judge will look at a dog and ask himself can this dog do what it was intended for.

Now I do think your statement may have merits with the Rat Terrier being accepted into AKC as RTCA will register anything and call it a Rat Terrier. Time will tell here, but your blanket statement holds no water on current UKC show breeders.

My 2 cents
Now I am off to squirrel hunt with a couple of my UKC Grand Champions....

Jeff








* Hosted for free by InvisionFree